Consumer Reports: Antennagate Closed, iPhone 4S ‘Recommended’ | Wifi Walker, J B Chaparal Properties

Consumer Reports: Antennagate Closed, iPhone 4S ‘Recommended’

The defective iPhone 4S is lilliputian by a Moto’s tea-tray sized Droid Bionic. Photo: Jim Merithew/Wired.com

Consumer Reports, a product-testing organization, has announced a iPhone 4S “recommended.” Its predecessor, we might remember, had this endowment funded interjection to some receiver issues that influenced few people in daily use, and are also a underline of flattering many any cellphone, ever.

“Apple it seems has remedied a ‘death grip’” says Consumer Reports’ James McQueen, adding that “the 4S doesn’t humour a same accepting problem [as a iPhone 4].” If we remember, a Antennagate failure was caused by some people losing accepting bars on their iPhone’s when they overwhelmed a bottom left dilemma of a receiver frame wrong.

Consumer Reports gained utterly a bit of broadside from this when it refused to ascent a rating to ‘recommended,’ even after Apple “fixed” a problem by changing a approach a accepting bars were displayed. Actual consumers roundly abandoned this recommendation and incited a iPhone 4 into a fastest offered phone, like, ever.

Apple’s new antenna-switching tech, that can flip a several antennae between broadcast and accept as needed, are expected obliged for a rejecting of a problem in a iPhone 4S, though that still isn’t adequate for Consumer Reports. The iPhone 4S might have gotten a Recommended label, though it still isn’t good adequate “to concede a iPhone 4S to outscore a best new Android-based phones in a Ratings.”

Which phones kick it? The Samsung Galaxy S II and a Motorola Droid Bionic, among others. And a winning features? Consumer Reports rated these phones aloft since they “boast incomparable displays than a iPhone 4S and run on faster 4G networks.”

Those would be a incomparable screens that make a phones unfit to fit in pockets, and a 4G radios that site idle watchful for a networks to make some 4G dungeon towers.

Still. One extraordinary underline of a Droid Bionic creates me consider I’ll never buy an iPhone 4S. What is it? What’s a underline that pushes this handset to a really tip echelons of a CR charts? “Excellent keypad readability underneath many lighting conditions.”

Consumer Reports recommends a iPhone 4S [Consumer Reports. Thanks, James!]



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